Paris...à pied, les yeux ouverts, le nez en l'air
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    Parisian architects paid little attention to the notion of « mens sana in corpore sano » as there are so few sports-related decorative features on façades but with some exceptions.

    L'hôtel Mercédes (aujourd'hui immeuble de bureaux) construit en 1902 dans le XVIème arrondissement par Georges Chedanne sur les rues de Presbourg, Lauriston et l'avenue Victor Hugo est dédié au sport automobile puisqu'à l'époque l'automobile était plus un sport (élitiste et fort coûteux) qu'un moyen de transport. Ce choix est évidement commercial et sert à positionnerl'hôtel vis-à-vis d'une clientèle dynamique et fortunée.The Hôtel Mercedes (today an office building) built in 1902 in the 16th  arrondissement by Georges Chedanne on rue de Presbourg, rue Lauriston and avenue Victor Hugo is devoted to motor-racing because at the time the automobile was more of a sport (elitist and terribly expensive) than a means of transport. This was obviously a business-led choice and was used to chime with the tastes of a wealthy and cutting-edge clientele.

     

   

    Three sculptors Boutry, Sicard et Gasq shared the work.

     

 

    On rue Lecourbe in the 15th  arrondissement, a late-20s dressed-stone building has references to golf and tennis, both leisure-class pursuits;  but the nearby Avenue de Breteuil is a smart address.

     

 

    At the same period, the entrance of some social housing constructed on the site of the old fortifications highlights the merits of women’s tennis and ski-ing when emancipation was very much in the air. On the other hand, there is a luxurious building in the 16th arrondissement which promotes ice-skating in vaguely classical dress.

     

       

     

    Still in the late 20s, a school near the Canal Saint Martin in the working-class 10th arrondissement hymns education as a means of achieving greatness as an intellectual, artist, engineer or even footballer.

    Lastly, there is building which is undated but most likely from the 1980s featuring basket-ball.